The January Man (E–book)

Christopher Somerville à 3 free download

Rs see p 135 Somerville s ift of description also extends to birdlifeA redshank flies across my path with a white flash of wings calling sharply tieu tieu tieu tieu A lapwing flaps past from the direction of the river peew peew peeiw hoarser and expressive than the redshank a cry very much like a cat in distress p149 I sincerely enjoyed the onomatopoeia that he uses to realistically depict birdcallsI think my favorite walks were the one in June on the Ilse of Foula and in September in Sherwood Forest I certainly have a far The Way Between the Worlds (The View from the Mirror, greater envy to see England outside of the cities which unfortunately are all I have seen thereThe personal aspect to the book are the reminiscences of the author s father who had served in WW2 and worked until retirement for GCH and as most in thateneration never really talked about his experiences During his various hikes in the present the author remembers various hikes and incidents from his life with his father It was particularly touching when his father loosens up a bit after a few beers in the Old Peculiar Pub in August I have to admit that the book did inspire me to ask my dad with whom I have never spent than a few hours alone to Inverloch Volume 4 go on a hike sometime if for no other reason than to know a little about him as Christopherot to know his dad I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to those who enjoy walking love nature and of course appreciate a The Good and Beautiful God good pint The January Man was so much than I d expected It was a beautiful piece of nature writing filled with vivid descriptions of the author s experience walking the British Isles across the seasons Full of wildlife observations flavored with a bit of folklore some family history and childhood memories it was also a love letter to his father and it was incredibly heartwarming I even teared up while reading it though it wasn t sad at any point However it was soaked with immense love to which it was hard to remain indifferentI m a huge fan of the UK of its language character nature traditions history literature music and people Christopher Somerville s story was aem for me because it was such a reat insight into the life I dream of It felt real It s partly painful partly joyful is a uote from this very book which describes it perfectly This is a lovely book wonderful use of language too I had it as an audiobook and was unsure if author was best narrator at first in January chapter but after that I realised he was probably the best narrator Only criticism His bird impersonations all sounded the same Haha There again I m no twitcher so others may disagree Christopher Somerville walking correspondent of The Times newspaper documents his walks around the British Isles The book is structured into the twelve months of the year as described in the folk song The January Man and the chapters are linked by reminiscences of the time Somerville spent walking with his father a man who seemed Lanes and old paths in rain and fair weatherThis exuisitely written account of the British countryside both inspires us to don our boots and explore the 140000 miles of footpaths across the British Isles but also illustrates how on long distance walks we can come to an understanding of ourselves and our fellow walkers Over the hills and along they by ways Christopher Somerville finally finds the man behind his father’s modest buttoned up wartime facad.

The January Man (E–book)

Hip he h I have thoroughly enjoyed this book about the joys of walking and there are so many little titbits of information that shall stick with me for ages particularly about badgers on the side of the roadI even went hunting for scurvy rass until I realised that was featured in a different month to the one I was experiencing so the flowers were probably past it nowstill I ot to have a play on the motorwayOne of the things about walking that I enjoy is how your mind wonders it s amazing how many issues at work I ve solved during my lunchtime walk on the common and that part of walking features heavily in this book Somerville s mind wanders again and again to his father about how distant he was when Somerville was a lad and how once he had retired they were able to bond over long distance walking it was a reat homage to a father and at times uite heart breakingI liked how this book was laid out a walk per month usually with a reason for walking in that area ie lambing season or particular birds arriving back in the UK The walk is only a small part of the chapter so much history has been included and a lot of nature crammed in too A favourite part for me was when he did St Cuthbert s walk an area of Scotland I have been too a few times and he covered the bit of the route I have done it absolutely tipped it down for me at the same spot and it would be funny if we took shelter at the same placeThe writing is very The Horse in Celtic Culture good easily drawing in the reader and notetting boring at any point Somerville has written a lot of books so I ll have to check another one out soonBlog review The January Man is perhaps three books in one it is about Christopher Somerville s month by month year of walking Britain to the tune of The January Man by David Goulder it is about the incredible wildlife and personal stories of people he meets during the journey and it is also a spiritual journey he takes with his father who passed away ten years before he wrote the book The book has humorous descriptions of Christopher battling for life and limb on the various terrains that he ambles across but especially brilliant descriptions of the life he finds all around him For example in March in the valley of Nidderdale as a Yank I was really enthralled with all these Middle Earth Westeros names which I have never read or heard beforeThe ewe heaves herself up to stand and let ravity do the rest and the lamb drops out onto the rass with a slithering thumb the membrane stretching alongside crimson with red blood p 79The following monthApril becomes the yellow month The countryside is flooded with yellow the oily yellow of celandine stars soft sherbet yellow of primroses clear Dayglo olden yellow of dandelions p 98 I really enjoyed the way he brought the countryside alive in these descriptions and the wealth of information on the flora and fauna that he discovers for another nice list of flowers and colo. Love of walking his prodigious need to do it – and how and why I walk myself” The January Man is set over one calendar year as month by month region by region Christopher Somerville walks the routes that remind him of his father As he travels the country – from the River Severn to the Lake District the Norfolk Coast to the Isle of Foula off the west coast of Shetland – he describes the history wildlife landscapes and people he passes down back.

Late in 2015 Christopher Somerville lost his father after a short battle with cancer He had had a tempestuous relationship with him as a teenager partly because of the teenage angst but also because of his father s job They tried to bond by undertaking longer walks through the countryside but it didn t always work As they both rew older and a little wiser the relationship strengthened and the walks that they undertook brought them back together Undertaking a walk in a different part of the country for each month Somerville weaves together a mix of personal recollection of his father the countryside he is wandering through and the natural wonders he sees around him He walks in the floods in the West country the tiny Isle of Foula near Shetland round Sherwood Forest and along the Lancashire coast and heads to Lyme Regis for a family athering He uses these walks to look at the man his father was and to try to comprehend him He worked at GCH and could not say a word about This is a slow moving and lovely book I really enjoyed the author s description of his father and their relationship Wonderful descriptions of the British countryside and nature but what really spoke to me was this uoteThere is no walking to compare with walking in snowIt is transcendental cleansing walking in order to walk away from oneselfthe rhythmic creak creak of boots on snow drawing the mind away across the blank white canvas of the countrysideI love walking in snow An interesting mix of different themes in one book part biographical of the authors father autobiographical nature walking and reviews on the literature of others I feel it shouldn t work but it kind of does uite ood reading for lockdown as it reminds you of the world that is out there Somerville is the walking correspondent for the London Times This is much than a collection of recommended walking routes The book has several shaping elements the folk song that lends the title which A Succession of Bad Days gives commentary both literal and symbolic on the seasons of the year and of life a circular tour of Britain wandering from Somerville s childhood home near Cheltenham all the way to the Shetland island of Foula and back to Somerset and his memories of walking holidays with his late father their means of being close even though his reserved father carefully hid his wartime memories and top secret work for theovernment Inevitably I liked some chapters Foula in June and December a walk up Cley Hill to play the melodeon on Boxing Day and joining in a mummers play better than others but overall I think this The Multi-Orgasmic Man gives a lovely sense of the British landscape and its countryside customs At the risk of damning this book with faint praise I can t say much than that it was uiteood I liked the idea of dividing it up into 12 chaptersmonths each one drawing inspiration from a recent folk song The January Man Added to this Somerville also ponders on the relations. “In January 2006 a month or two after my father died I thought I saw him again – a momentary impression of an old man a little stooped setting off for a walk in his characteristic fawn corduroys and shabby uilted jacket It was walking that first caused rifts between us in my sulky teenage years and walking that brought us back together later on; and this ‘ghost’ of Dad has been walking at my elbow since his death as I have ruminated on his reat.